Mayor, chief, prosecutor owe Annapolis explanation

There are many questions about what happened on Christmas Day last year, when an Annapolis police officer took $1,500 from the car of a man who was briefly detained but not arrested — and that money vanished. The man, Kennethel Cherry-Bey, has been repaid. The officer who took the money, Cpl. Duane Daniels, has retired, whether or not that was entirely his idea. But the matter hasn't been resolved. The city is facing a lawsuit and, given its decision to write a check to Cherry-Bey, a settlement is probably coming. (Capital)

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July 13 // Chris Adams: Paid-leave law was wrong for Maryland

For five years, the Democrat-controlled legislature in Maryland has tried to pass HB-1, titled the Healthy Working Families Act, which is a controversial state-mandated paid leave law that would be imposed on private businesses. In two of those years, Maryland Democrats also had the benefit of controlling the executive branch of government with Martin O’Malley. With that backdrop, I read with interest a letter to the editor from Jared Schablein attacking Gov. Larry Hogan while failing to recognize the governor had offered his own common-sense paid sick leave bill. (Daily Times)

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Peter Beilenson: Bring addiction treatment into mainstream care

Before addressing the problem of drug addiction and how and where to treat it, two facts must be acknowledged. First, substance abuse is a chronic health condition, not unlike high blood pressure or diabetes. As with these conditions, addiction requires compliance with a treatment plan to keep it under control. Second, addiction knows no bounds. The prevalence of this disease is similar across gender, race and socioeconomic class. Though the drugs of choice may vary, adults in Ruxton abuse substances at a comparable rate to adults in East Baltimore. (Balt. Sun)

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Speaking up on school redistricting

Plans for transferring students between Howard County's public schools to alleviate crowding and rebalance enrollment starting in the fall of 2018 are coming into clearer focus. School planners now say about 16 percent of students — some 8,700 — could be shifted to different buildings under redistricting recommendations released last month. The growing pains appear to be most acute at elementary schools in the county's northern and eastern reaches and it's expected that students at 11 of the county's one dozen high schools could be on the move. In all, 16 schools are projected to have more students than they were designed to comfortably accommodate. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Nick Berry: Coming city election won't lack drama

The looming city elections will have a major impact on the civic lives of Annapolitans. The primary election is Sept. 19, with the general on Nov. 7. Incumbent Mayor Mike Pantelides faces an opponent in the Republican primary, lawyer Nevin Young. Dan Nataf, director of the Center for the Study of Local Issues at Anne Arundel Community College, says that Pantelides' record, like Larry Hogan's as governor, can be summed up as "do no harm." (Capital)

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July 12 // Henry Rollins: America's Real Safety Net Is Drugs, Alcohol, Cheap Food and Free Porn

Since the inception of America, as much concept as actual thing, the poor have been despised by the rich. It is an adversarial relationship that has not relented from then to this moment. This antagonism and the agony it engenders is not only our collective story but informs much of our behavior now. No matter who you are or how you’re living in this country, it has saturated your life. A lot of good things have happened in America, but many of them were attempts to neutralize or correct some incredibly awful things that eventually became so egregious that enough people stood up. Rarely has there been a spontaneous act of kindness. There were presidents like Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson who went hammer and tongs at change and tried to improve things. (LA Weekly)

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Carl Tobias: Renominate Gallagher for the District of Maryland

In September 2015, then-President Barack Obama nominated Stephanie Gallagher, a magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court of Maryland since 2011, to a vacancy on this court. Gallagher is an exceptionally qualified, moderate nominee whom Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin, both Democrats, powerfully supported. In May 2016, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved Gallagher without dissent. Nonetheless, her nomination languished on the floor until Jan. 3 when her nomination expired, a result attributable to GOP obstruction in refusing to grant her a final debate and vote. (Wash. Post)

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Chester “Chip” Davis Jr.: Marylanders misled by drug pricing bill

In May, Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh declared victory when the General Assembly passed House Bill 631, giving him the power to sue certain drug companies for “excessive” price increases. In doing so, unfortunately, Marylanders were misled about these new powers to police drug prices. In reality, this legislation will decrease competition and raise prices, neither of which will benefit patients, employers or taxpayers in the state. (Balt. Sun)

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