Wednesday, February 8, 2023 |
Baltimore
61°
Fair
FOLLOW US:

Commentary

Rodricks: Prevent another generation of neo-Nazis; support public service

Consider this contrast in two men: Wes Moore, the new governor of Maryland, calling young people to public service, while Brandon Russell, a young neo-Nazi, allegedly plots to cause massive chaos by knocking out the power grid around Baltimore. One day we hear the new governor, a 44-year-old Army veteran, declare that “service will save us.” A few days later, federal authorities charge Russell, the 27-year-old founder of a violent extremist group, in a scheme to, as his girlfriend and co-conspirator allegedly put it, “lay this city to waste.” I don’t know if the contrast between Moore and Russell will occur to anyone else; it might seem weird to even mention the two in the same sentence. But I make the connection because of where we are as a nation.

Read More: Baltimore Sun
Hutzell: Could artificial intelligence hold the key to saving the Chesapeake Bay?

Your body mass index is a calculation of your health based on a simple calculation using your height and weight. Now, imagine a far more complex bit of math. This one uses layers of equations to sort 30 million data points instead of just two. To help, you get to use powerful computer systems once available only to government agencies or to well-funded researchers. Right now, an increasing number of scientists around the Chesapeake Bay are doing just that, using artificial intelligence to answer huge environmental questions that define the future of a watershed where more than 18 million live across six states.

Opinion: The federal workforce is aging. It’s time for a new generation.

The workforce of the U.S. government is aging. Today, just 7 percent of permanent full-time federal employees are younger than 30 compared with 20 percent in the broader labor market. Meanwhile, 31 percent of all government employees are eligible to retire by 2025. Young people are keen. They are not the problem. Federal leaders should pay more attention to hiring young people to sustain the workforce, and some managers have a tendency to hire for experience instead of building the talent bench. Recruiting on college campuses is suboptimal. Individuals younger than 30 who do apply are discouraged by lengthy and convoluted hiring processes and a pay system that is outdated.

Alanah Davis: In this new year, an allowance of curiosity, grace, and not knowing

I was still at an age where a Scholastic book fair on a day when golden-brown leaves might rustle underfoot in The Bronx or when a ham and cheese Lunchable were enough of a rare treat to excite me when I learned about fake drawer fronts. I’ll explain later. My mother, aged at what I assumed to be as young as the women on Living Single but definitely not as old as the ladies on Golden Girls, lived in a high-rise building owned by the New York City Housing Authority, known to most as the projects. The projects are known for their pungent hallway smells, metal doors, and stairs which were always of good use when the elevators were frequently broken — especially on days when you and your mom might have grocery shopped for oxtails, goldfish snacks, cabbage, and other goods at C-Town, a chain of supermarkets in the northeast.

Electric morning
What’s the rush? Baltimore’s mayor needs to put the brakes on conduit deal with BGE and allow for public input

“Transparency, accountability and integrity” — those are the three traits Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott promised from his administration in an op-ed published in The Sun a few months after he took office in December 2020. “These ingredients are essential for building trust,” he wrote, “especially given the public skepticism toward City Hall.” We would remind him of those words as he pushes forward a privately negotiated deal between the city and Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to control the city’s underground conduit system. Few details had been publicly revealed about the plan until Wednesday afternoon, when the mayor’s office released the proposed contract, nearly two weeks after the Baltimore Brew first broke the story about the effort.

Read More: Baltimore Sun
Could artificial intelligence hold the key to saving the Chesapeake Bay?

Your body mass index is a calculation of your health based on a simple calculation using your height and weight. Now, imagine a far more complex bit of math. This one uses layers of equations to sort 30 million data points instead of just two. To help, you get to use powerful computer systems once available only to government agencies or to well-funded researchers.

A chat with ChatGPT: How would the artificial intelligence model approach certain Maryland issues

Organizations across the country are grappling with how to deal with the headline-grabbing idea-generator known as ChatGPT, launched publicly for free in November as part of a research project by San Francisco-based artificial intelligence company, OpenAI. Most groups appear to fall into one of two camps: those who would ban it to avoid cheating, as Baltimore County Public Schools has done, and those who would embrace it as a limited — if flawed — tool, like the writers of a recent op-ed published in The Sun, who recommended it as a sort of thought organizer.

Read More: Baltimore Sun
The frenzy over China’s spy balloon is dangerous and unwarranted

So the Battle of the Balloon is over — and, not surprisingly, America won. On Saturday, one of the most advanced U.S. weapons systems — an F-22 Raptor — shot down one of China’s most primitive surveillance systems: a balloon that had been traversing the United States during the previous week. The whole incident leaves me feeling unsettled and alarmed. Oh, I’m not worried about the spy balloon. The violation of U.S. airspace was unacceptable, but it did not pose any actual threat, and it’s doubtful that it gathered any intelligence that Chinese spy satellites cannot.

Perspective: Small businesses can attract, retain employees despite labor shortages

As we start a new year, Americans are usually filled with a renewed sense of optimism — a fresh perspective and a positive outlook on what is to come. For small business owners, 2023 hasn’t brought the same excitement. Labor shortages, inflation and supply chain disruptions are battering businesses of all sizes across this country, and Baltimore-area small businesses such as mine are experiencing all these challenges. Sen. Ben Cardin said last summer that “our communities have regained a hard-earned sense of normalcy after the worst of COVID-19, but for many small businesses, the nightmare continues.”

Nathanson: The future of our downtowns

The recently concluded winter 2023 meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors focused on the many challenges facing the country’s large and medium-sized cities. Many of the concerns were those directly related to the continuing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic dislocations. With city leaders gathered in Washington, D.C., the Brookings Institution organized a webinar titled “Governing the Post-Pandemic City.”  Hosted by Brookings’ interim President Amy Liu, the panel included as speakers Mayor Justin Bibb of Cleveland and Mayor Bruce Harrell of Seattle. In their discussion, I heard the recognition by these leaders that cities – and particularly their downtowns — are not going back to their pre-pandemic status as the public health threat lessens.

The Morning Rundown

We’re staying up to the minute on the issues shaping the future. Join us on the newsletter of choice for Maryland politicos and business leaders. It’s always free to join and never a hassle to leave. See you on the inside.