University of Maryland School of Law establishes U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings scholarship

The University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law has established a scholarship in honor of the late U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, who graduated from the school in 1976. The Cummings scholarship has an initial endowment of $50,000 and will be awarded annually to one Maryland Carey Law student who has an interest in public service, a record of academic excellence and demonstrated financial need, according to a University of Maryland news release. (Balt. Sun)

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School system says state found allegation of improper help unsubstantiated

School officials in suburban Maryland on Wednesday pushed back on a teacher’s allegations of improper assistance on projects required for graduation, saying state investigators had found a claim of cheating to be unsubstantiated. Montgomery County school officials said educators provided help to one student on a “bridge project” — done to qualify for a diploma when students do not pass state-required exams — but that the state found the assistance was permitted and appropriate. (Wash. Post)

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Maryland lawmakers want to spend billions more on schools. Where will they find the money?

Maryland lawmakers are trying to pull off an improbable feat: Finding a way to raise billions of dollars for public education without most residents noticing a hit to their wallets. Democratic leaders of the state’s legislature have promised to fund an array of improvements to public schools — including expanded prekindergarten, increased teacher pay and other programs — without a broad-based tax increase. Leading lawmakers haven’t yet unveiled their plan of how to make it work, even as Republican Gov. Larry Hogan continues to hammer a message that they’re being irresponsible by pushing reforms without a way to pay for it. (Balt. Sun)

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School funding lawsuit filed by civil rights groups can continue, judge says

A Baltimore City Circuit judge Tuesday preserved a decades old lawsuit that had pushed the state to provide millions more for Baltimore’s schools, a ruling that eventually could have far-reaching consequences for state funding of public schools in Maryland. The ACLU of Maryland and the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund went to court last March to reopen a landmark case filed in 1994. They argued the the state is not living up to its obligation — spelled out in a consent decree two decades ago — to provide enough funding for city schools. (Balt. Sun)

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Delaware schools would have to teach about genocide, the Holocaust under proposed law

Delaware schools could be required to teach about genocide and the Holocaust. A proposed law making its way through the General Assembly would require the state to create a curriculum around the subject. It would apply to public and charter school students in grades six through 12. The two-page bill by Rep. Debra Heffernan, D-Bellefonte, filed Tuesday, was approved by the House Administration Committee on Wednesday and now goes to a full House vote. (Delmarva)

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University of Maryland to end long-standing Chinese government-supported program

The longest-operating Confucius Institute in the U.S. is set to close nearly a year after Congress passed legislation that would restrict federal funds if the Chinese government-supported program continued. The 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, which was passed amid heightened tensions with China, included language that required U.S. universities to either continue their Confucius Institute or receive financial support from the Defense Department. (Wash. Times)

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CCBC, Johns Hopkins awarded $3.88M from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a combined $3.88 million to the Community College of Baltimore County and Johns Hopkins University to support collaborations between the two institutions on Humanities curriculum and pedagogy. The grant money will be used to continue the Humanities for All initiative, which was started in 2017 with an original Mellon Foundation grant of $1.725 million to the two schools. Humanities for All provides Humanities students a more dynamic learning experience and helps improve transfer success for students. CCBC’s continued collaboration with the Mellon Foundation will allow CCBC to use innovative approaches – some already proven and some new – to connect the humanities to intellectual growth.  

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McDaniel College students get acquainted with Westminster through the camera lens

McDaniel College students got to know their surroundings a bit better through their camera lenses as the Modern Photography class took a photo “field trip” to downtown Westminster. The campus is busier this month than in previous years thanks to a new requirement that freshmen take a “My Design” course over the college’s January term — although the 14 students in Modern Photography were mostly upperclassmen. The photo tour on Thursday was a chance to collect photos for their final cumulative portfolio for the course. When instructor Walter Calahan was a college student, film was expensive, and he wishes he could have documented the moments and fashions of the time. As a young person, it felt like things would stay the same way forever. (Carr. Co. Times)

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