Prince George’s NAACP wants audit of school district’s curriculum

The Prince George’s County NAACP told Gov. Larry Hogan on Tuesday that it wants to initiate an audit of the county school curriculum and overturn a state law that gave County Executive Rushern L. Baker III the power to select the schools superintendent. Bob Ross, president of the county branch of the NAACP, said the organization is also considering filing a civil rights lawsuit against the school district, which is the second-largest in the state. Ross met for nearly an hour with Hogan, Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford and members of the governor’s executive staff to discuss the state’s probe of alleged grade-tampering and fraudulent graduation rates in Prince George’s. (Wash. Post)

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Six Baltimore schools on the chopping block

The community has a chance to speak out after another six schools in Baltimore city have been designated to be shut down. School system officials are recommending closing four elementary/middle schools including Coldstream Park, William Pinderhughes, Rognel Heights, and Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary/Middle School. They are also looking into closing two middle/high schools including Friendship Academy of Engineering and Technology and Knowledge and Success Academy. (WMAR)

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EPA gives $150K for Chesapeake Bay restoration IT upgrade

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that it is providing an additional $150,000 to the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) to continue support for managing and improving the computer technology used for Chesapeake Bay restoration. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore production company launches studio space for young artists

A Baltimore-based production company is offering studio space aimed at young artists looking to spark their careers without much money. Human Being Productions on Tuesday announced the launch of Human Being Studios, which will offer work space and tools to fledgling photographers and videographers in a 940-square-foot space near the Maryland Institute College of Art in Bolton Hill. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Johns Hopkins student reports sexual assault at campus fraternity

A female student said she was sexually assaulted at a fraternity on the Johns Hopkins University campus, school officials said. The student told officials she was sexually assaulted by a male Hopkins student at the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity at 3203 N. Charles Street earlier this semester. The incident was reported through the campus alert system on Monday. The alert says school officials know the identities of both students and “are proceeding in accordance with University policies.” (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore children practice reading with dogs, learn compassion

The gray and white pit bull sat in the center of the circle of fifth-graders. He listened attentively as the students took turns reading to him. At times, his droopy eyes appeared to lock with those of the readers. Four-year-old Knox is one of the “pet ambassadors” who travel to Westport Academy Elementary/Middle School every Tuesday to listen to students read as part of an effort to improve their reading skills and boost their self-esteem. Organizers say practicing reading with dogs promotes confidence among students who may struggle to read at grade level. (Balt. Sun)

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UM Carey intellectual property clinic expanding services for entrepreneurs

In an effort to increase its presence in Baltimore and offer more legal services to startups, the intellectual property clinic at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law is going to provide business law services and is opening a location at the new Graduate Research Innovation District at the University of Maryland. (Daily Record)

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December 12 // Hopkins taps Duke executive to head medical system

Kevin W. Sowers, a career executive with the Duke University Health System, has been tapped as the new president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Sowers replaces Ronald R. Peterson, who announced earlier this year that he was retiring. Sowers will take the position at the $8 billion academic medical center and health system after 32 years with the Duke University Health System. For the last eight years he served as president and CEO of Duke University Hospital. (Balt. Sun)

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