At Howard budget hearing, familiar frustrations with superintendent, school system

Calls for the resignation of Howard County Schools Superintendent Renee Foose resurfaced Monday evening as around 40 people stood outside the county government's rain-washed headquarters in Ellicott City before a hearing on the school budget. Foose has no plans to resign from her position, a spokesman for the school system said Monday. But her nearly five-year-long tenure as superintendent has been marked by struggle, including a failed state bill that would've allow the school board to terminate Foose and resident-led petitions to remove her from her post. (Howard)

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French international school presents plans for elementary building on Old Georgetown Road

Rochambeau, the French international school based in Bethesda, last week unveiled plans to build a new elementary school campus on several properties along Old Georgetown Road. The school, which serves about 1,080 students from preschool to 12th grade, operates across three campuses in Bethesda and Chevy Chase. However, in recent months, the school has begun assembling land to construct a new building that would accommodate up to 550 students from kindergarten through fifth grade. (Bethesda)

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Baltimore orgs trying to help prevent ‘summer slide’ with activities for kids

More than 12,000 young people have applied for summer jobs in Baltimore, but others who may not be old enough to go to work need something to do, too. Ron Matz reports, Mayor Catherine Pugh and many local organizations are working to make that happen. Watching TV, playing video games, spending days at the beach, and a lack of reading, can lead to what educators call “the summer slide.” (WJZ-TV)

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For Sikhism facts, students in Montgomery become the teachers

Hana Kaur Mangat looked out at her students, wondering which one she should call on. “Anyone have any questions?” she asked in a perfect educator’s mix of prim and peppy. “If not, I’ll just keep asking questions. I have lots of questions to ask.” Hana, 17 years old and totally poised in a red scarf and bold glasses, stood before an audience of adults who all work as teachers in the Montgomery County Public Schools. The students have been teaching a sort of Sikhism 101 to their teachers at after-school events at their gurdwara — a Sikh house of worship — in North Potomac for four years. (Wash. Post)

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Students raise concerns about diversity, bullying in Washington County

Problems in schools such as insensitivity toward diversity and bullying were among the top concerns raised by a group of area students during a community meeting Monday night. The meeting at the Washington County Free Library was hosted by the Maryland Youth Advisory Council, a state organization that works to ensure that youth are given the opportunity to provide input on public policies that affect their future. (Herald-Mail)

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April 25 // Grange honored for boosting breakfast program

We've all heard the phrase “breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” At Grange Elementary School, however, it's not just a motto — it's a mission. To that end, members of the school community celebrated last Wednesday as the school was named a district-level winner in No Kid Hungry's 2017 Maryland Breakfast Challenge. Part of the larger Share our Strength nonprofit, the mission of No Kid Hungry is to put an end to childhood hunger. (Dundalk Eagle)

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Maryland high schools rank as the best in the country, U.S. News says

Maryland high schools are the best in the nation, with four ranking among the top 150 in the country, according to a new list from U.S. News & World Report. The list, published Tuesday morning, ranks more than 2,600 high schools across the country based on state high school proficiency tests, disadvantaged students’ performance on those tests, graduation rate, and then Advanced Placement test data. On a state-by-state level, U.S. News said Maryland schools performed best by their measures, with 5.9 percent of the public schools achieving “Gold Medal” status and 21.6 percent achieving “Silver Medal” status. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Spring breaks next year will shrink to comply with Hogan Labor Day order

The week-long spring break that Maryland schoolchildren just enjoyed will be much shorter next year in some counties. Several school systems in the state have shortened their 2018 spring breaks to comply with Gov. Larry Hogan's executive order mandating that the school year start after Labor Day and end by June 15. In Anne Arundel County, education administrators had to rework 10 days on the calendar for the next school year to meet the new requirements. They sliced the number of days built into the schedule for snow day closures from five to three, and added four days to the end of the school year. Winter break will be one day shorter and spring break will go from six business days to three. (Balt. Sun)

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