Baltimore County Schools Cancel Proms, Senior Activities

Baltimore County Public Schools have cancelled all proms and senior activities due to the COVID-19 emergency. Superintendent Darryl Williams announced the decision in a letter dated Friday. "Just like you and your family, I, too, was looking forward to those culminating events, but due to the health crisis, all proms and senior activities are cancelled," Williams wrote. "Members of our school Board, your principals, and I share your disappointment about losing these special events, but we must abide by these executive orders by our governor." (WBAL)

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U.Md. provides additional details about partial fee refunds

The University of Maryland has released more details about partial fee refunds students will get following the transition to online classes to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The university will give students prorated fee refunds or credits for the following: room and board if they have been living in dorms, parking and shuttle, athletics, recreation services, Stamp Student Union, performing arts and cultural centers, student facilities and sustainability. (WTOP)

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‘Education Via Computer Needs To Be Limited’: UMD Psychologist Says Parents Must Step Up To Nurture Kids In Age Of Coronavirus

With schools closed for more than 55 million children across the country in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus, students, parents and teachers are facing a host of new and unexpected challenges. Schools all over the country have created virtual classrooms online, but many parents and caregivers find themselves managing the workload and tools like Google docs and Zoom meetings — all in addition to working remotely, taking care of finances and putting food on the table. (WJZ)

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Teachers, Students Adapting To Distance Learning

Classes resumed for many Worcester County Public Schools students this week as teachers began using technology to provide online instruction in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. With schools closed through at least April 24, educators on Monday launched a variety of distance learning efforts. The online education initiatives began for high school students this week and are set to extend to elementary, middle and intermediate school students April 6. (Dispatch)

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‘I miss my students’: Md. teacher prepares kids for distance learning

Typically, the days at Cooper Lane Elementary School in Landover Hills, Maryland, start with the sound of “We’re All In This Together” from “High School Musical,” blasting in the hallways as kids file into class each morning. The title of the song seems especially appropriate as teachers get parents and students ready for distance learning in Prince George’s County schools — a result of the closure due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. (WTOP)

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Prince George’s Schools Hand Out Laptops, Offer Internet to Bridge Digital Divide

With schools closed because of the coronavirus crisis, many of Prince George’s County Public Schools’ 136,000 students are facing “extraordinary hurdles” in continuing their education, the district said. Families without access to computers or internet at home can pick up a laptop computer and arrange internet service with help from the district starting Wednesday. (NBC 4)

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Van Hollen: Federal Stimulus Money Should Go to Close ‘Homework Gap’

Since winter, U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) has been advocating for federal funding to close “the homework gap” created when millions of students throughout the country lack access to reliable internet at home. Now, with more than 120,000 schools closed throughout the U.S. to stop the spread of COVID-19, the issue is all the more important, Van Hollen said Wednesday. In Maryland, all public schools are closed through at least April 24. School districts are implementing distance learning plans on a county-by-county basis. (Md. Matters)

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Howard County proposes real estate tax hike to pay for schools

Howard County is proposing a hike in real estate taxes to help pay for a new high school in Jessup as part of the proposed 2021 capital budget. The school would be the 13th high school in the suburban Baltimore county and is expected to hold up to 1,650 students. Plans to begin development in the coming year would include hiking the real estate transfer tax from 1% to 1.5% as part of a $92.7 million capital budget request for education, County Executive Calvin Ball said Wednesday. (Balt Bus Journal)

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