Student tracking, secret scores: How college admissions offices rank prospects before they apply

To learn more about prospective students, admissions officers at the University of Wisconsin-Stout turned to a little-known but increasingly common practice: They installed tracking software on their school website. When one student visited the site last year, the software automatically recognized who she was based on a piece of code, called a cookie, which it had placed on her computer during a prior visit. (Wash. Post)

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More student absentee ballots could indicate higher turnout

In addition to hitting the books this fall, more Virginia college students may hit the polls next month, according to the Virginia Department of Elections. Virginia Department of Elections data show that 10,923 students in Virginia have applied for absentee ballots this year. That’s more than double the number of absentee ballot applications (4,878) received in 2015, the last year all 140 seats were up for reelection in the General Assembly, according to Christopher Piper, commissioner of the department. (Wash. Post)

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Survey finds evidence of widespread sexual violence at 33 universities

About one-quarter of undergraduate women say they have been victims of sexual touching or penetration without consent since starting college, according to a survey this year on sexual assault and misconduct at 33 major universities. The survey released Tuesday was the second from the Association of American Universities in recent years to document the disturbing prevalence of sexual violence at prestigious public and private schools. A 2015 study involving many of the same universities found broadly similar patterns of sexual misconduct. (Wash. Post)

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FSU receives $4.1 million for teacher education program

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Frostburg State University a five-year grant of $4.1 million for a program to increase the number of certified teachers in Maryland schools with a focus on the STEM field, like sciences, mathematics and computer science. In partnership with Frederick and Garrett County public school systems and FSU’s Master of Arts in Teaching degree, the Maryland Accelerates program also allows established teachers to mentor the new educators. (Times-News)

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Safety Procedures, Video Monitoring Increase in Md. Schools

Maryland’s public school systems are continuing to ramp up student safety plans — from bus cameras to active shooter drills. Plans include continuing to install security cameras in the hallways and entryways of schools — including at the elementary level — and putting the most up-to-date school safety training into action. (Md. Matters)

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Howard library system programs seek to help veterans cope with PTSD and share their military experiences

Writing about their experiences in the military can mean confronting and conquering the past for some veterans. For Reed Kohberger, who is credited with saving 396 lives during his 33 years in the U.S. Coast Guard, it’s about the 40 or 50 people he couldn’t rescue. For Venita Willis, it’s about continuing to heal from emotional scars left by a sexual assault during an Army tour in Korea that led to her medical discharge after 16 years of service. (Balt. Sun)

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Students Identified In Assault At Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy West

Baltimore City Schools officials have identified the students who violently assaulted another student in a bathroom at Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy West. A video, posted to Instagram on Wednesday, showed a student being violently punched in a bathroom at Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy West. (WJZ)

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D.C. increasing education spending by at least $20 million

The District will increase education funding by at least $20 million for the current academic year after the traditional public school system struggled to balance its budget for the previous fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30. The funding increase will be spread evenly between the traditional public school and charter sectors, according to Paul Kihn, deputy mayor for education. Under federal law, students in the charter sector and the traditional public school system must receive equal funding. (Wash. Post)

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