Proposed budget cuts loom large over higher education

A week after President Donald Trump's proposed budget, cuts are continuing to worry many  — even those in the higher education field. The cuts are hitting close to home at Salisbury University. SU stands to lose its Federal Work-Study program, one that employs 65 students on campus, said Barri Zimmerman, the director of financial aid at the university. (Daily Times)

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Maryland approves lease for USMH's Hagerstown expansion

The Maryland Board of Public Works on Wednesday officially approved a 20-year lease between the University System of Maryland at Hagerstown and Hager5 LLC, the developer renovating a building across from the USMH campus. The building, at 55-59 W. Washington St., will house a new hospitality- and tourism-management program slated to begin next fall, as well as new science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, laboratories the center will share with Washington County Public Schools. (Herald-Mail)

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Proposed boundaries for new Butterfly Ridge Elementary won't fix all overcrowding problems

A new elementary school in west Frederick, meant to ease overcrowding at area schools, won’t completely erase the problem. The proposed attendance boundaries for Butterfly Ridge Elementary School, as endorsed by the superintendent, were presented to the Frederick County Board of Education Wednesday. Superintendent Terry Alban’s recommendation comes after months of extensive meetings in which district officials sought public comment. (News-Post)

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March 22 // Young pledges to redirect $10 million from Baltimore police to schools, sparking debate

Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said Tuesday he will look to cut $10 million from the police budget and redirect the money to city schools. Young, who first made that pledge to cheering education advocates outside City Hall, is among a growing number of city leaders who have suggested spending less on policing and more on education and other services — even as Baltimore grapples with unrelenting violence. (Balt. Sun)

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Some of Hogan’s statements on Rockville rape miss the mark

White House press secretary Sean Spicer wasn’t the only government official to conflate some issues when answering questions about the two undocumented immigrants charged with raping a fellow student at Rockville High School. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), answering questions from a television reporter after touring a police station in Annapolis, made a series of questionable comments about the case, which involved a 14-year-old victim. According to an audiotape provided by the governor’s spokeswoman, Hogan blamed the Obama administration for the presence of the two suspects in the United States. (Wash. Post)

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Baltimore County school board votes to remove heat closure policy

The Baltimore County Board of Education voted Tuesday to abolish a controversial policy that forced the superintendent to close schools without air conditioning on excessively hot days. The policy — which was put in place last summer — directed Superintendent Dallas Dance to close non-air conditioned schools on days when forecasts predicted the heat index would hit 90 degrees by 11 a.m. Early in the 2016-17 school year, more than three dozen county schools were closed on four days under the policy. Additionally, sports practices, games and other events were canceled at the schools that were affected. (Balt. Sun)

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After proposals to plug city schools deficit, principals face new decision: What can they expect to restore?

Baltimore principals have agonized over their next budgets, cutting arts classes, tutors and librarians to prepare for an impending $130 million deficit across the city school district. Now they face another decision: What can they expect to restore? School district administrators are calculating the dollars that could be returned to each principal under plans to shrink the deficit. These amounts will be provided to the roughly 180 public school principals this week, said John Walker, the chief financial officer for city schools. "This will be the dollars added back to their budgets," Walker said. "We're going to send out two different scenarios." (Balt. Sun)

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Struggles of new East Baltimore school show challenges of integration

The school had an auspicious start, hailed as a design masterpiece by architecture critics. The building was divided into five areas, or "houses," each with its own cafeteria and flexible open spaces that would allow for small groups of students to learn together doing projects, art, theater and other activities. Connected to the school is the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Early Childhood Center, which shares the same board but is not part of the school. It accepts children from ages six weeks through pre-kindergarten. Together, the Weinberg center and the school are roughly the footprint of a large Walmart, with concrete courtyards, small green spaces and trees. (Balt. Sun)

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