Board of education votes to keep current retirement benefits

The Talbot County Board of Education voted 4-2 Wednesday, March 15, to keep the current retirement benefits for Talbot County Public Schools employees and retirees the same, while also adding an opt-out option. (Star Dem.)

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City arts school taps famous alumni for funding

A Baltimore City school is hoping its famous alumni can help it survive planned budget cuts. Media outlets report that on Monday night, actor Josh Charles became the first to take up the cause of helping the Baltimore School for the Arts. He wrote a series of tweets to his 126,000 followers spotlighting the $130 million budget gap faced by the school and other Baltimore public schools. The Baltimore School for the Arts, which also counts actress Jada Pinkett Smith and rapper Tupac as alumni, provides arts education alongside a traditional academic curriculum. (WMAR-AP)

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March 16 // For U-Md.’s undocumented students, new resources aim to help

The University of Maryland is taking new steps to help some of the most vulnerable students among the 38,000 enrolled at College Park: those who are undocumented immigrants. Officials at U-Md. and many other colleges and universities have repeatedly expressed solidarity with these students since the presidential election. President Trump took a hard line against illegal immigration during the campaign, but he has recently suggested that he hopes to work out a solution for some who were young children when they arrived in the United States. (Wash. Post)

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Survey: Rates of unwanted sexual contact rebound at Naval Academy

The rate at which female midshipmen at the Naval Academy say they experienced unwanted sexual contact almost doubled in the past two years, the Defense Department reported Wednesday. More than 14 percent of female midshipmen reported such contact, which ranges from unwanted touching to rape, in a survey conducted every two years. That's up from about 8 percent from the last survey, but down slightly from older survey results. (Balt. Sun)

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Carroll attempts first count of homeless youth

Carroll County is part of the pilot phase of a new initiative that is intended to count homeless youth and young adults, an effort organizers say could lead to better services for this vulnerable population. Now through Sunday, March 26, unaccompanied homeless youths ages 13 through 17 and young adults ages 18 through 24, are encouraged to participate in the 2017 Youth Count Survey, a campaign of Youth REACH MD being conducted through the Carroll County Circle of Caring Homelessness Board. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Pugh says snow won't affect plan to contribute more to Baltimore schools

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh on Wednesday said that Tuesday's snowfall won't significantly affect her plan to contribute more money to the city school system to help close its $130 million budget gap. Last week, Pugh and General Assembly leaders announced a plan to help close the gap that relies in part on the mayor redirecting money for snow removal. Pugh said this week's snow, which came at the end of a mild winter, wasn't large enough to change those plans. (Balt. Sun)

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Light snow, plus Hogan's order equals long summer for Maryland school children

After a winter of little snow — and an order by the governor — Maryland school children are likely to have an exceptionally long summer break. By this time last year, students had been snowed-out of school at least a week, and the makeup school days pushed deep into June. The snowfall this week capped a far different winter, one tied as the fifth-least snowy on record. The mild winter coincides with a state mandate that schools can't open before Labor Day. With few snow days to make up, children are poised for roughly three full months of summer vacation. (Balt. Sun)

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New Harford elementary math program stumps some students, parents say

Harford County Public Schools' new elementary school math program, enVisionmath 2.0, has made learning math so difficult for some students that it has caused them to hate a subject they once excelled in, according to students and their parents. "My favorite subject used to be math, but now with the new math program it makes me frustrated and upset," Robbie Bennett, a third-grader at Church Creek Elementary School, said during a recent Board of Education meeting. (Aegis)

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