Temporary employee at Md. distribution center fatally shot herself after killing 3 people, wounding 3 others

Mike Carre’s workday had barely begun Thursday at a complex of sprawling warehouses in Maryland when a man he didn’t know staggered into his office, bleeding from a bullet hole above his left knee. “There’s a shooting at Rite Aid!” the man blurted, before Carre and others helped him into a chair. Yet again in the United States, a suicidal assailant with a gun had opened fire, apparently indiscriminately. This time, authorities said, the shooter was a 26-year-old woman, and the victims — three dead, three wounded — were in or just outside a massive Rite Aid distribution center in Aberdeen, about 30 miles northeast of Baltimore. (Wash. Post)

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Howard coal-tar sealant ban would hurt companies, executives say

A bill being considered by the Howard County Council to ban coal-tar pavement sealants and some alternatives is being criticized by businessmen who fear a ban might inspire neighboring Baltimore County to enact similar legislation, leading to the demise of their companies. The bill to prohibit sales and use of the sealants was introduced by Councilman Jon Weinstein at the behest of 16 fifth-graders from Centennial Lane Elementary School in Ellicott City. The students did research on coal-tar and asked the councilman to consider the health and environmental risks from the thick, black liquid. (Ho. Co. Times)

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'Unprofessional and distasteful': Details of Baltimore Symphony's sexual harassment investigation test its image

The usual image of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is one of expertly trained, highly professional classical musicians in formal attire performing with unanimity of purpose the great works of Beethoven and Shostakovich. That stands in contrast to the portrait painted by an attorney’s summary of findings in a sexual harassment investigation at the esteemed institution. A top player in the ensemble, principal oboe Katherine Needleman, has named another top player, concertmaster Jonathan Carney, in a charge of discrimination filed against the BSO with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (Balt. Sun)

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Ocean City median fence: Zero deaths, serious incidents equals successful summer

A multimillion dollar pedestrian safety project that included a new median fence in Ocean City has been deemed successful by officials after one summer season. More pedestrians have been seen properly using the crosswalks and fewer collisions have occurred in the area of the median fence, said Lindsay Richard, public information officer for the Ocean City Police Department. She said the number of people who do try to go around the median fence and jaywalk are few and far between. "Driving up and down Coastal Highway, there's a noticeable difference in that you don't see pedestrians trying to cross traffic without a crosswalk," Richard said. (Daily Times)

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Darlington horse breeder Bill Boniface, who bred '83 Preakness winner, is named a Harford Living Treasure

Harford County horse breeder J. William Boniface, who bred and raised 1983 Preakness winner Deputed Testamony on his Creswell farm, was honored Tuesday night as a Harford Living Treasure. “It’s tremendous what you’ve brought to our county,” Councilman Chad Shrodes told Boniface as he presented him with a proclamation during the Harford County Council meeting. “You really carved out a spot in Harford County history and I can’t think of a more deserving person than yourself as a Harford Living Treasure.” (Aegis)

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Overdose numbers aren't everything in prevention, Carroll agencies say

Various Carroll County officials, in various ways, said Thursday that the number of overdose deaths is not indicative of Not in Carroll’s success. They did so at the Board of County Commissioners’ Sept. 20 meeting, where Carroll County State’s Attorney Brian DeLeonardo — along with Carroll County Sheriff Jim DeWees, Carroll County Health Officer Ed Singer and Carroll County Youth Service Bureau Executive Director Lynn Davis — discussed what has come from the 2018 funding for Carroll’s drug abuse prevention campaign called Not in Carroll. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Maryland gets another $39 million in federal funds to fight opioid crisis

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is giving Maryland $39.1 million in funding dedicated to helping fight the opioid crisis. The epidemic of opioid-related overdoses and deaths nationwide has raged on through 2018. According to federal sources, opioids claimed the lives of about 130 people per day in the U.S. in 2017. In Maryland, more than 2,000 people died from opioid overdoses last year, and the death rate in Baltimore has been about two people per day. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Committee recommends Annapolis donate $10K to Capital Gazette Families Fund

An Annapolis City committee recommended Wednesday donating $10,000 to the Capital Gazette Families Fund instead of making the city a cosponsor for the July 28 benefit concert. The Annapolis City Finance Committee voted to strike a resolution that would make the city a co-sponsor of the Annapolis Rising benefit concert honoring victims and first-responders of the June 28 mass shooting in the Capital Gazette newsroom. (Capital)

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