Maryland weather: Colder temperatures projected for later in winter. Why? Blame the Madden-Julian Oscillation.

While many burrowed indoors the third week of November as extreme record-breaking cold impinged upon life across the Mid-Atlantic, the snow machines at Wisp Ski Resort were busy whirring and churning out a base layer of snow for the upcoming winter. The third week of November is the earliest the ski resort has started making snow in the past five years, said Lori Zaloga, director of marketing for Wisp, in McHenry. (Balt Sun)

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FDA Continues To Trace 3 Separate E. Coli Outbreaks Related To Romaine Lettuce

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is continuing to investigate three separate outbreaks of E. coli linked to lettuce, one of which was first pointed out by Maryland health officials. Information from the Maryland Department of Health led the FDA to farms in Salinas, California, as possible sources of contaminated romaine lettuce. That led national health officials in late November to urge consumers not to eat lettuce grown in the area. (WJZ-TV)

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Gov. Hogan Proclaims 2020 As ‘Year Of The Woman’ In Maryland

Aligned with the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment which gave women the right to vote, Gov. Larry Hogan has declared 2020 the Year of the Woman in Maryland. “Our state’s history has been shaped by extraordinary women leaders, and our administration remains committed to empowering and advocating for women in Maryland,” said Governor Hogan at a kickoff event in Annapolis on Thursday. “I look forward to the many events taking place statewide to commemorate the Year of the Woman. ” (WJZ-TV)

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Extending Summer Weekends A Goal For Ocean City

Expanding the resort’s stranglehold on weekend summer travel was a topic of discussion this week during the Tourism Commission meeting. During Monday’s meeting, Bob Rothermel of TEAM Productions outlined the proposed special events calendar for next summer and the discussion inevitably came back around to how to expand weekday visitor numbers.  (Dispatch)

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Baltimore County police add camera towers to Pikesville kosher markets following Jersey City shooting

Baltimore County Police have placed camera towers at two kosher markets in Pikesville following the fatal mass shooting Tuesday in a kosher grocery in Jersey City, New Jersey. County Councilman Izzy Patoka, who represents the area, told residents in an email Thursday that he partnered with the Pikesville police precinct and Baltimore City Councilman Isaac “Yitzy” Schleifer to have camera towers placed at the Market Maven and Seven Mile Market to monitor for “any suspicious activity” and to ensure the safety of the employees and customers at both stores. (Balt Sun)

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After losing two historic dwellings, Woodberry moves closer to becoming a historic district

The mill village of Woodberry came a step closer to gaining status as a Baltimore City historic district after the city’s preservation commission voted unanimously on Tuesday to support the designation. The proposal originated with a request from the Woodberry Community Association after a development group headed by Katherine Jennings tore down two historic stone millworkers’ houses whose shells had been targeted for preservation. (Brew)

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Call 311 for a dirty alley in Baltimore? City’s response depends on where you live

Judy Taylor keeps track of every call she makes to 311, jotting down the date on a piece of lined paper that she keeps on her fridge. She frequently requests that city crews come to her Carrollton Ridge neighborhood to clear piles of trash from the alley behind her rowhouse: abandoned mattresses, overflowing plastic bags, discarded liquor bottles. “I call and call and call,” says Taylor, 78. A Baltimore Sun analysis of city data shows that if a resident in southwestern Baltimore, where Taylor lives, calls the nonemergency help line to report a dirty alley, a resolution almost never comes by the recommended deadline of seven business days. (Balt. Sun)

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Saltwater Intrusion, Result Of Rising Sea Levels, Harming Maryland Farmers

Maryland might be one of the first places to start seeing climate refugees in our lifetime. Rising sea levels are already starting to affect farmers in the state who say they’re losing land. When farmer John Swaine heads out to check on his crops, his biggest fear is that he’ll see water where he should see soil. “It seems like it’s a little worse this year,” he said. With 1,200 acres of corn, wheat and soybeans, Swaine said water from a nearby creek only seldom used to creep up to his crops; now, it’s almost daily. “This spot probably will never come back,” he said. “It’s probably permanently like this.” (WJZ-TV)

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