Mayor: Union Bridge not in favor of solar project unless farm can be annexed to provide tax revenue

Union Bridge officials are not in favor of a proposed solar project that would fall just outside the town’s limits, but the decision on whether the project moves forward is in the hands of the Maryland Public Service Commission. On Monday night, the PSC held a second public hearing in Union Bridge to discuss the solar project with local residents. The proposed project, brought forward by Boston-based company Citizens UB Solar, has been downsized, but still doesn’t meet the town’s standards, according to Union Bridge Mayor Perry Jones. Jones said the town is not in favor of the solar farm because it isn’t consistent with Union Bridge’s master plan. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Federal court order blocks pipeline near Hancock

A federal judge Wednesday upheld Maryland’s denial of an easement for a proposed natural-gas pipeline west of Hancock. “We are pleased that the court has agreed that a private pipeline company cannot force the state to accept a pipeline under the Western Maryland Rail Trail,” Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh said in a written statement. “We will continue to defend Maryland’s right to control its public lands against any other efforts by the natural gas industry to move forward with this project.” The decision Wednesday came from a judge in the U.S. District Court in Baltimore. (Herald-Mail)

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With city’s trash still in headlines, Young and residents tout BMORE Beautiful program

With volunteer crews still fanning out to pick up trash after President Trump’s derogatory comments calling Baltimore “a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess,” Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young and local community leaders today touted the efforts they’re already making to keep neighborhoods clean. At a press conference at City Hall, they highlighted the work of BMORE Beautiful, a program that provides resources to neighborhood associations to keep their communities clean. Through one of the program’s initiatives, Care-A-Lot, 38 neighborhood organizations have mowed and maintained 587 vacant lots across Baltimore, according to the mayor’s office. “It didn’t happen overnight and it can’t be corrected overnight,” Young said of the city’s trash problem. (FishBowl)

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Pedestrian Signals To Be Installed Next Year at Bethesda Intersection Where Crash Occurred

A pedestrian crossing signal is expected to be installed next winter at an intersection where two people were struck by a vehicle last week, according to the Maryland State Highway Administration. Because of “design and utility challenges,” more than a year has passed since the department approved its placement, according to a spokeswoman. Installation of the signage is expected to begin in “late winter 2020,” she said.  Pedestrians will need to push buttons installed at the crosswalk to activate a set of flashing “beacons,” intended to “increase motorist awareness of pedestrians that are present at the crosswalks,” SHA said. (Bethesda)

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Thistle Road In Baltimore County Reopens Nearly 15 Months After Major Flooding

Nearly 15 months after floodwaters wiped out parts of Thistle Road in western Baltimore County, traffic is once again flowing on the two-lane road near Catonsville. It’s been 451 days since part of Thistle Road washed out near Frederick Road and the Patapsco River; now, most signs of the storm’s impact are gone. “Yeah, it’s been a long time. The last flood took out River Road and Thistle,” said Tom Weathern, the manager at nearby Dmitri’s International Grille. Cleanup, design, permitting and construction kept Thistle Road closed until Wednesday, when the $2 million project wrapped up. Federal funds paid for around 75 percent of the repairs. (WJZ-TV)

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Parade scheduled during rush hour in Baltimore leaves city councilman wondering how it was approved

A parade of the Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine is scheduled to pass through downtown Baltimore on Wednesday evening, disrupting rush hour traffic and leading one city councilman to wonder how such an event was approved. The Shriners parade is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. at the intersection of Market Place and Pratt Street, according to Baltimore Department of Transportation officials. Workers and visitors are advised to expect road closures having a significant impact on downtown traffic beginning at 5 p.m. Parade participants will proceed west on Pratt Street to finish at the intersection of Sharp Street. The event is expected to last about three hours, officials said in a release. (Balt. Sun)

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New parks and rec director gives Howard its ‘best bet to succeed’

Even though Raul Delerme has never watched an episode of the popular TV show “Parks and Recreation,” his nearly 30 years of experience with the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks means he knows what to expect as its new chief. In June, Delerme was named the department’s new director, replacing outgoing director John Byrd, who retired after serving nine years as the parks and rec head. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore police commissioner says he hasn’t ruled out using surveillance plane in the future to fight crime

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said Tuesday he hasn’t ruled out resurrecting a surveillance airplane program, which city police grounded in 2016 after the revelation of its use sparked an public outcry. In an interview with The Baltimore Sun, Harrison said he met Monday with Ross McNutt, founder of the Ohio-based Persistent Surveillance Systems, but has not made a decision about the plane’s future. (Balt. Sun)

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