Crews blast through Bloede Dam to begin long-awaited removal

Crews blew up a section of the Bloede Dam on Tuesday, launching in earnest a process of removing the structure and restoring a section of the Patapsco River to its natural profile. The long-awaited blast occurred around midday Tuesday. Now, the rest of the dam will be removed in chunks over the next six weeks, a $17 million project. The project is more than a decade in the making. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

September 12 // Someone call 311! Baltimore's $2.6 million upgrade to 311 system generates complaints

The reviews for Baltimore’s new 311 apps are in, and they are not good. “You took a functional app and removed the functions,” one user wrote in Google’s online app store. “This app sucks now.” Rating? One star out of five. Lisa Allen, director of Baltimore’s 311 system, apologized for the problems and said the city’s IT department is aware of the issues with the apps and is working to fix them. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Baltimore Police Dept. has failed to prioritize patrol positions, leaving a 26.6% vacancy rate, report says

The Baltimore Police Department has failed to prioritize patrol positions, leaving a 26.6 percent vacancy rate — significantly higher compared with other areas within the department — and should consider restructuring, a new report found. Of the 1,102 police officer positions budgeted across the department’s nine districts, only 809 are filled, according to the 189-page staffing study filed to the court Tuesday. The report is part of the years-long sweeping reforms required by the consent decree reached between the city and the U.S. Department of Justice last year. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Annapolis City Council postpones spending decision on Annapolis Rising Festival

The Annapolis City Council voted late Monday to postpone a decision on spending nearly $34,000 in taxpayer money to help pay for the Annapolis Rising Festival. The item will be sent to the finance committee for further study and then back to the full council on Sept. 24. The benefit concert, honoring the victims and first-responders of the June 28 mass shooting at the Capital Gazette office, cost a total of $66,000. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Annapolis officials tout bright future for solar panel plant, even on a cloudy day

A sprawling new field of solar panels draped atop an 80-acre, capped Annapolis landfill has started generating both clean energy and fresh income for the city, officials said at the plant’s ceremonial opening Tuesday. “This is going to be a tremendous source of clean, renewable energy for years to come,” Mayor Gavin Buckley told a small gathering at the site. (Capital)

Read Full Article

Patapsco River dam set for demolition

If it ever stops raining, one of the biggest remaining barriers to fish migration in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will finally come down. Bloede Dam, a long-dormant hydroelectric facility near Baltimore, is supposed to be breached with explosives any day now, the first major step toward opening up Maryland’s Patapsco River to river herring, shad and eels. (Md. Reporter)

Read Full Article

Carroll County commissioners come to second round of Freedom Plan agreements

The Board of County Commissioners made more progress on the Freedom Community Comprehensive Plan at its second meeting dedicated to the topic on Tuesday, Sept. 11. Commissioners took the Freedom Plan — a 10-year master plan for the Freedom Area — from the Planning and Zoning Commission in late August in an effort to finish it before commissioners Richard Rothschild, R-District 4, and Doug Howard, R-District 5, leave office in December. (Carr. Co. Times)

Read Full Article

Ride sharing use up at least 68% in OC

A review of bus ridership and how ride-sharing companies impact mass transit was a topic of discussion at a resort committee meeting this week. On Tuesday, Public Works Director Hal Adkins presented the Ocean City Transportation Committee with statistics and the potential impacts of ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft on transit ridership and revenue. Adkins told the committee from fiscal year 2017 to fiscal year 2018, the number of riders using services like Uber and Lyft have grown. (Dispatch)

Read Full Article