Bennett Freeman: Business leaders believe in clean energy

Maryland has repeatedly shown leadership on climate change and the clean-energy solutions that will both tackle the problem and provide economic growth. In order to continue this leadership, Maryland faces an important choice: whether to take another step forward on clean energy and reap the economic and job-creation benefits, or to settle for less. Gov. Martin O'Malley made the call late last month for the state to make the step forward, and we applaud his leadership. (Balt. Sun)

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With start of school, drivers must take care

Next week, approximately 56,000 children will board school buses for the first day of classes in Anne Arundel County. And statistics show that those children will be far safer than those being driven in cars. But we should still give some thought to making them safer yet. All too many state drivers still don’t realize that the flashing red lights and retractable stop signs on school buses are not a suggestion — they are a legally enforceable order. And not just to the motorists behind the bus but to those in front of it, on the other side of the road. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: Martin O'Malley starts to take his victory lap

Don't look now, my fellow Marylanders, but I think the Martin O'Malley victory lap has commenced. The governor, with a year and a half to go in his second and final term, has started telling us all about his impressive tenure. The governor gave a speech over the weekend that was mostly that — a way of cementing the local narrative about how his pragmatism and competency got us through the worst economic cycle in decades. Like everything else O'Malley does, it's all part of a strategy to enhance his standing as a Democratic presidential candidate in 2016. (Balt. Sun)

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Unequal outcomes

It may seem paradoxical that even as more black and Hispanic students attend college, America's system of higher education is becoming more racially polarized and unequal, with whites far more likely to graduate, earn advanced degrees or find good jobs than their minority peers. Yet that's exactly what researchers at Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce recently found. The reason? While white students are increasingly clustered in the nation's top 468 schools with selective admissions policies, most of the nation's minority students attend open-access and community colleges that spend substantially less on instruction than their more selective counterparts — leading to wildly divergent opportunities and outcomes for students. (Balt. Sun)

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Susan Reimer: Martin O'Malley, please don't run for president

If you have been watching the delightfully capable John Oliver make us forget Jon Stewart this summer on Comedy Central's The Daily Show, you know that he has been howling at the mainstream media to stop talking about 2016 until Mr. Stewart gets back. He only has a few weeks in the chair, he says, and he wants to talk about absolutely anything other than the presidential race. So do we all, because we are still woozy from 2012. (Balt. Sun)

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Crime is still low in Carroll

While the most recent statistics on crime show an increase in Carroll, the county is still a safe place to live and raise a family with overall incidents of crime relatively few and far between. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Richard Vatz -- Gansler's gaffe: Unwise, but not worthy of an apology

An ugly fight unfolded last week between gubernatorial aspirants Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler regarding their campaign rhetoric. Mr. Gansler was surreptitiously recorded saying, "I mean, right now [Mr. Brown's] campaign slogan is, 'Vote for me, I want to be the first African American governor of Maryland.' ... That's a laudable goal, but you need a second sentence: 'Because here's what I've done, and here's why I've done it.'" (Balt. Sun)

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More open meetings

When Frederick Mayor Randy McClement finally got around to announcing that Joshua Henson had been appointed to the city’s Board of Supervisors of Elections, Henson had already been on the job for more than two weeks. Henson had been appointed during a closed meeting of the mayor and Board of Aldermen. At that same meeting McClement and the board also discussed two other appointments they were making, one to the city’s Planning Commission and the other to the Historic Preservation Commission. (News-Post)

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