Dan Sparaco: Pugh 'ain't the one' to move Baltimore forward

Things were supposed to be different after the unrest of 2015 and the elections of 2016. But they are not different. It's been two long years since the mayoral primary, and Baltimore still finds itself trapped between the politicians we elect and the leadership we need. We’re still looking for our path forward as a city. But at least one thing is certain: Catherine Pugh ain't the one to help us find it. (Balt. Sun)

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Profits up

Nobody should have been surprised when CSX Transportation eliminated another 100 jobs at its Cumberland rail yard. (See: “100 CSX workers lose jobs,” May 12 Times-News, Page 1A.) We were warned. The Jacksonville Daily Record reported in March that CSX cut 4,600 jobs in 2017 and was looking to cut 6,200 more over the next three years. This repeated what railroad CEO James Foote and CFO Frank Lonegro said in December. (CSX corporate headquarters is in Jacksonville, Florida.) Mark Wallace, CSX executive vice president and CAO, said “We’re a bloated organization ... We will achieve this principally through attrition.” (Times-News)

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Mike Rogers: In District 32, let's build bridges, not walls

Hello, fellow citizens of Anne Arundel County! My name is Mike Rogers and I am delighted to introduce myself as a candidate for Maryland House of Delegates, District 32. I am a retired 29-year career Army officer who has made Anne Arundel County my home for the past 15 years. In that time, I have been raising a family and working to make my life as purposeful as possible while helping to better my community. I know how real the struggle is for so many. That is a big part of the reason I am for running for office. I have served my country and want to bring that experience to serve my community. (Capital)

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May 16 // De Sousa had to resign; Pugh has to do better

Darryl De Sousa’s resignation as Baltimore police commissioner was an unfortunate necessity. His admission that he failed for three years in a row to file his federal taxes — an offense for which he faces three misdemeanor charges — diminished his moral authority as the city’s top law enforcement official, called into question his ability to manage a 3,000-employee department and sapped public confidence in Mayor Catherine Pugh’s administration. Even if the additional federal subpoenas related to his pay, expenses and taxes don’t lead to additional revelations about Mr. De Sousa’s finances, even if he is somehow able to clear up his legal problems, Mayor Pugh could not have allowed him to come back from his suspension. (Balt. Sun)

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Can the Maryland model for health care become a national one?

When Maryland convinced the federal government to allow a massive experiment under the Affordable Care Act to change the way hospitals are paid to care for patients, it was a very big deal. Creating incentives for hospitals to keep patients healthy and in the community rather than paying them more to fill their beds was nothing short of revolutionary. Working out the details in a way that satisfied players in the health care system whose interests were sometimes opposed was a monumental task. It almost didn’t happen, and that was when the O’Malley administration was negotiating with the Obama administration. (Balt. Sun)

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In the 1970s, John Apostol faced issues that still confront Annapolis mayors

A nifty remark attributed to Mark Twain — there’s no evidence he actually said it — is “History doesn’t repeat itself but it often rhymes.” For instance: As their new mayor, Annapolis voters pick a pleasant younger professional who hasn’t held elective office before. He’s a Republican from a Greek-American immigrant family associated with a popular city restaurant. He attributes his win to advocacy for limited growth. While in office he wrestles with that issue, as well as historic preservation and major budget difficulties. You might think we’re talking about a recent former mayor. But it’s a description of John Apostol, who died last week at his family’s home in Georgia at age 79. (Capital)

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Pete Smith: I want to go on working for the residents of District 1

I work for them. Four simple words, but a reminder over the last three years of who I represent and the power that the citizens of District 1 have. Almost four years ago, I entered the arena of the County Council and pledged to work on three items: education, public safety and small business. These principles were the foundation of my platform and the motivation for me to serve every day. I pride myself on serving others with hard work, sincerity and integrity. Since the beginning of my term, my record has spoken to efforts to strengthen these pillars. I am even prouder that I have supported these efforts without increasing the burden on the citizens of our county. (Capital)

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Cricket Goodall: Horse industry boosts Md. year round, not just at Preakness time

For more than 250 years, horses have played a vital role in Maryland’s culture, spirit and history, going back to 1743, when the Maryland Jockey Club — the oldest sporting organization in North America — was chartered. Just a few years later, George Washington raced his horses in the streets of Annapolis in the 1750s. And roughly 120 years after that, the first Preakness Stakes was held at Pimlico in 1875. Since then, the second stop of the Triple Crown has put Maryland at the center of horse racing every spring, but it’s important to remember that the state’s horse industry makes measurable impacts on our environment and economy throughout the year. (Balt. Sun)

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