Chuck Jenkins: Maryland needs a law-and-order attorney general

Marylanders need and deserve a law-and-order leader in the Office of Attorney General. In this 2018 general election we have the opportunity to elect a true supporter of law enforcement who places the safety and protection of Marylanders as his top priority. Craig Wolf, whom I have known for almost 20 years in both the law enforcement and political arenas, is that man. Craig served as a federal prosecutor with the Department of Justice, overseeing and prosecuting cases of human trafficking and online child pornography. While serving as an assistant state’s attorney for Allegany County, Maryland, he established a reputation of being a bold, effective and aggressive senior prosecutor in cases of child abuse, domestic violence, and other major felony cases. (News-Post)

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David A. Plymyer: Md. needs one inspector general to oversee all agencies

Gov. Larry Hogan’s proposal that the General Assembly create the position of inspector general with jurisdiction over the state’s 24 local school systems does not go nearly far enough. The problems of fraud, waste and abuse in Maryland are not limited to school systems. What happened with Dallas Dance in the Baltimore County school system could happen in any state agency because of the absence of an effective watchdog. If the governor wants to do something worthwhile about corruption, he should ask the General Assembly to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2020 that would establish an independent Office of Inspector General with jurisdiction over all state agencies. (Balt. Sun)

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Larry Hogan, Ben Jealous lone debate is missed opportunity in governor race

When there's no opportunity to meet candidates in person or to attend a speaking event to listen and watch, the next best way to become a better-informed voter is to tune in for a televised candidate debate. That's why it's disappointing that there will only be one debate between Maryland's gubernatorial candidates, incumbent Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, and challenger Ben Jealous, a Democrat. The Eastern Shore, separated from Maryland's capital of Annapolis and heavily populated metro core, is less accessible to candidates like Hogan and Jealous, who do visit the Shore but who are home-based across the bay. (Daily Times)

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September 14 // Finding the next Leana Wen is every bit as crucial for Baltimore as hiring a new police commissioner

Baltimore has been blessed with a series of superstar health commissioners, and Dr. Leana Wen is no exception. She combined an emergency room physician’s sense of urgency with the intense focus on Baltimore’s deep seated health problems and the boldness in addressing them that have been hallmarks of the department. It’s no fluke that the National Association of County and City Health Officials named it the top big health department in the country this year. We are sad, if not altogether surprised, to see that Dr. Wen has been recruited away for a national post, and we have every expectation that she will be just as successful in running Planned Parenthood as she has been here. (Balt. Sun)

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Two crucial hires for Baltimore

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh now has two of the most important jobs in her administration to fill. The departure of Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen to head Planned Parenthood nationally removes from the city one of the most successful and inspirational leaders of the last decade or so. Wen’s energy, imagination and ability to focus on the most critical health needs of the city – and to do so in a way that attracted partners and allies from disparate circles – was unparalleled. (Daily Record)

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BCPS student Margot Deguet Delury: 'It’s surreal that we students are learning to fight for our lives at school'

At the beginning of every school year, each grade in Baltimore County assembles in the auditorium to hear that bullying is bad and lateness is inexcusable; the talk takes up a whole class period. Last week, having heard this same talk 10 years in a row, I didn’t plan to listen very attentively. Many of us presumed that school safety was what it always had been — rote and redundant. But there was nothing rote or redundant about the information given to us this time around. After covering the basic no-no’s, our vice principal distributed a leaflet entitled ALICE. Who is Alice? Alice is a product of Maryland’s Safe Schools Act 2018, a training approach meant to prepare school communities for the “very unlikely event” of an active assailant in the building. (Balt. Sun)

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Ted Walsh: Why Baltimore should pay for a level of service, rather than the service

“I don’t even get out of the car, I just mark the job done and drive away.” A Baltimore City maintenance worker told me that the other day, talking about repairing street lights in Central Park Heights. It’s the kind of statement a Baltimorean could spend a long time unpacking. We could talk about crime in Park Heights, about the lack of investment in poor communities, about white flight or “lazy government workers.” The question I’m more interested in is: How do we fix the dang streetlights? And streetlights are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Baltimore maintenance issues. (Balt. Sun)

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Jay Brodie: Finding redemption on Baltimore's 'road to nowhere'

"If you have a lemon, learn to make lemonade." Good advice! Without a doubt, Baltimore City's largest and most visible "lemon" is "The Big Ditch," a.k.a. "The Road To Nowhere," just west of downtown. It's a leftover from the proposed multi-leg expressway "system," most of which the city government, and activist citizens, wisely and successfully resisted. Demolishing the full block between West Franklin Street on the north and West Mulberry Street on the south, it was aimed to slice through Leakin Park on its way to linkup with I-70. That terrible idea was defeated by a Sierra Cub-led lawsuit. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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