Rick Hutzell: Honor the dead at Capital Gazette today but also remember those who remain

Others have spoken so eloquently about our lost friends, I've struggled to find the right words. I could tell you that Rob Hiaasen would have been far better suited than I am to listen, console and maybe even advise those left behind. Or I could describe Gerald Fischman as a thoughtful, quiet man who would have written so much more effectively of our grief and gratitude. (Capital)

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In remembrance of The Sun's Glenn McNatt

You may not know Glenn McNatt’s name, but if you read The Sun’s editorial page, you know his work. He served as an editorial writer for most of his 33 years at the paper, and like all good editorialists, he wrote passionately about an odd mish-mash of subjects: criminal justice reform, international affairs, infant mortality, early childhood education, outer space, the arts. If you’ve ever read an editorial about Baltimore’s tree canopy, that was conceived and composed by Glenn. (Balt. Sun)

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Richard E. Vatz: The death penalty should be revived

Immediately following the despicable, murderous attack on the innocent victims at the Capital Gazette newsroom, I made a contribution to Help Capital Gazette Journalists on GoFundMe. Then I made one of my rare sojourns to Facebook, wherein I complained about the elimination of the death penalty in Maryland. The civil responses I received – all responses were civil, for whatever that implies – generally supported the death penalty on the basis of the symbolic assurance it communicates to citizens that their government wishes to protect them or opposed it on the bases that it is applied discriminatorily against non-whites, and it does not serve as a deterrent. (Md. Reporter)

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July 5 // Our colleagues

This isn’t the most joyful of July 4th holidays for those of us in the media, so we’re not going to put a happy face on for today’s lead editorial. For many of us who have worked in newspapers, radio, television and other media, there is always the possibility of harm being done to us physically and mentally, though the idea of “death in the line of duty” typically means those who are out covering wars or disasters of some sort and mercifully, those have been few and far between over the centuries. So, what happened last week in Annapolis is a shocker to us on many levels. (Aegis)

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Joshua McKerrow: I will miss Wendi Winters for the rest of my life

If you're lucky, you know newsrooms are just like families. You laugh and share your victories, you bicker and you hold grudges, and you forgive (or are forgiven) and you laugh again and you show up the next day. You and your colleagues have a mission. You share a calling. Sometimes I'll leave at the end of the day and look at the crowd of bright, quirky, quick, brilliant people. Some are still in their teens, some coming up on 70. All intently hunched over phones and notebooks, doing the best damn job you can do for your community, and I get choked up and have to turn away. None of them deserved what happened on June 28. (Capital)

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Adam Sutton: Maryland's high school diploma lie

Graduation season has come to an end. The graduates have been educated by teachers using more innovative tools and techniques than ever before. Driving these initiatives is an awareness of the importance of individualization and differentiation in instruction. When we watch each unique student walk across the stage to receive their diploma, we celebrate that they have all met identical, lofty academic standards. We congratulate the skilled educators capable of tailoring instruction to meet the needs of these diverse students. Through this rite of passage, we tell students and parents that each one of these graduates has met the same high standard. In short, we lie: There is a disconnect between the instructional vision for K-12 education and its culminating award. (Balt. Sun)

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Sheridan Merrick: Where's the march for Baltimore's Keith Davis Jr?

On June 7th, 2015, two young black men were shot in Baltimore. Kevin Jones, a Pimlico security guard, was fatally shot 11 times. Several hours later, in the same neighborhood, Keith Davis Jr. was shot at 44 times by Baltimore City police officers, and hit three times. It was the first police-involved shooting in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray eight weeks earlier. Mr. Davis was immediately charged on 16 different counts, and only one of them stuck; a technicality: Mr. Davis was lying unconscious in proximity to a firearm, which due to a low level drug charge from several years before, required a five-year minimum mandatory sentence. (Balt. Sun)

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Today, we're walking in the Fourth of July parade to help Annapolis heal

Normally, we cover the Fourth of July parade in Annapolis. Generations of our young reporters have learned that this is the core of what a community newspaper such as The Capital does. Baton twirlers and jazzercise classes stepping in unison are suddenly news. Four guys around a table pretending to be 18th-century revolutionaries make for a great photo. Yes, even the politicians waving and handing out candy are worth including in the story. As the late Ed Casey, a longtime executive editor of The Capital, would have said: “Names and faces, names and faces.” Today, though, we’ll be among those faces. We are going to be part of the parade. Members of our staff will walk — the notion of journalists and ad reps marching is just too silly to bear — in the Annapolis Independence Day parade down West Street and Main Street to City Dock. (Capital)

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