March 15 // Hogan's staff alters headline to falsely imply his bill gained support

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan's staff altered the headline on a news story posted to his Facebook page in a way that falsely implied the governor's top legislative priority in Annapolis was gaining support. In fact, Democrats in the General Assembly had gutted his proposal. The doctored headline on a Baltimore Sun story appeared on Hogan's Facebook page  or several hours Tuesday, but was changed after The Sun asked the governor's office why it misrepresented the newspaper's work. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland Senate to vote on paid sick leave, transportation-scoring compromise

The Maryland Senate will consider two major bills on Wednesday, one that would provide employees with five days of paid sick leave and another that offers a compromise on Gov. Larry's Hogan's call to repeal a 2016 transportation-scoring law. The Senate spent nearly five hours in session Tuesday debating those bills and more than 60 others, including measures that would limit the amount of time students spend taking tests in school; expand the statute of limitations for victims of child abuse to file lawsuits; and impose a 10-year penalty on individuals convicted of distributing the highly addictive opioid fentanyl. (Wash. Post)

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Frosh warns that bond industry-supported bail bill undoes Maryland court's rule

Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh has a stark warning for the General Assembly: A bill backed by the bail bond industry could undo a landmark rule issued by the state's top court curbing the role of money in determining which accused suspects are granted pretrial release. Frosh is taking aim at legislation sponsored by Del. Curt Anderson and Sen. C. Anthony Muse that has won the support of bail bondsmen who are fighting to maintain their industry's place in the criminal justice system. (Balt. Sun)

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Hogan administration signals possible crab policy shift as lawmakers grill officials on firing

Maryland officials said Monday they are open to revising policies that have been credited with rebuilding the state's crab population over the past decade — a position state lawmakers allege motivated the firing of a veteran crab scientist last month. Natural Resources Secretary Mark Belton described a "customer service" oriented approach to crab management at a special hearing called to probe the dismissal of Brenda Davis, who gathers data each year to make recommendations on rules that limit blue crab harvests by watermen. (Balt. Sun)

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Trump’s new entry ban to be challenged in courts hours before it takes effect

With President Trump’s new entry ban set to kick in at 12:01 a.m. Thursday, lawyers and volunteers are mounting a last-minute campaign to halt the executive order in federal courts, mobilize protests and aid any travelers who might be stranded this time around. On Wednesday, federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland will hear arguments on whether to halt Trump’s revised executive order, which suspends the U.S. refu­gee program, temporarily bars the issuance of new visas to citizens of six Muslim-majority countries and slashes refu­gee admissions to the United States this fiscal year from 110,000 to 50,000. (Wash. Post)

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Bill would restore Medicaid for adult dental care for Md. residents

A local lawmaker wants to restore Medicaid coverage for adult dental care for Maryland residents who fall below 133 percent of the federal poverty level. But as with many proposals that come before the Maryland General Assembly, the issue could come down to money. Although there are a few exceptions — such as pregnant women and former foster children — Medicaid does not currently cover comprehensive dental care for adults. (Herald-Mail)

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Md.'s other 'Road Kill Bill' is really about animals

After months of Gov. Larry Hogan publicly criticizing a transportation transparency law last year that he refers to as the "Road Kill Bill," one lawmaker has introduced his own interpretation. Del. Marc Korman, D-Montgomery, decided a bill was needed that takes the Republican governor's nickname — which has been panned by Democrats — and attaches it to what he calls a serious subject: dead and decaying animals on the side of the road. (Capital News)

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March 14 // Md. Senate committee rejects Hogan’s nominee to Department of Planning

A Maryland Senate committee rejected Gov. Larry Hogan’s nominee to head the Department of Planning, arguing that she lacked the planning and managerial experience to lead the state agency. The Senate Executive Nominations Committee voted 11-6 against Wendi Peter’s nomination on Monday night. “Ms. Peters is likely qualified for a lot of things, but her background and experience do not make her qualified for Secretary of Planning,” said Sen. Bill Ferguson (D-Baltimore), the chairman of the committee, offering the sentiments of the majority of the panel. (Wash. Post)

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